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a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in car- sharing, that is a complement to the direction we are heading to be morris -- more sustainable. i want to think bmw for being here. we are in negotiations to get us into our fleet so we can utilize. unless we do it with the latest technology, people will not appreciate the mayor driving a bmw. [laughter] but we are doing it for the right reasons. i want to showcase that as we lead this country into a thought process, a challenge that our major cities, our urban settings can have solutions to our parking problems, have sustainable mobility as part of our alternatives in the vehicles and car-sharing as a principle for us to join our automobile makers as well as our vehicle owners and rentals as we challenge the public to say there are better choices coming forward with our partners in the industry. thank you, bmw. i know that ian and his team are here to announce this thing but i wanted to thank
. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an i
company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interestin
is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million do
automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cutting edge of the use of technology. i want to thank them and welcome them to not only the electric vehicle stage, which they have been working on, but also to this great program they are about to introduce, the drive now and park now technology. joined -- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking is really a challenge in the city. for people who own vehicles, and introducing people to car- sharing programs and ideas have been a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in c
on government data, you know, examples all over the place. if you look at the era in which the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i thin
the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i think will be very transformational in the years to come. >> wh, digital gov in the do
with two important things. one, i don't use services where you have to rent a smog machine and return it to the same place you started from. in san francisco we thrive on one-way, zero emission transportation options, at least i think we do. >> thank you. >>> and secondly, my last sentence, a viable one-way transportation option needs to offer reliability, accountability, and availability. and in san diego car to go does just that. thank you. >> thank you very much. keep in mind, people that in public comment you have two minutes and [speaker not understood] you have 30 seconds remaining and a louder chime when your chime is up. [speaker not understood] walter. >>> yes, thank you, supervisor cohen. if possible, can i bring [speaker not understood] now as well and we'll kind of use both of our times? >> you're not able to split your time. if you make your two minutes, i can ask you follow-up questions to allow you a few more moments to finish your thoughts. okay. how long is this going to take? >>> slightly over two. car share say car sharing organization very similar to what you've se
to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interesting play on how these people ma
>> tell us a little about some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at the california academy of sciences, there is a very large collection of preserved and live specimens, which are the evidence about evolution. we have the assassin spiders, which are spiders that exclusively kill and eat other spiders. they are under the microscope here. research done and the california academy's i rhinology lab suggests that the assassin spiders have been doing this for over 150 million years. this glassed in room is a real scientific laboratory, and the people in that room are preparing specimens of vertebrate, that is mammals and birds. the way they do this is to remove the skin, sew it together in a relatively lifelike pose, and ensure that it does not decompose. >> i am a really big class actress fan, so i am here to see them, and beer week. >> i wanted to learn something and have fun. >> i always enjoy it. i am not all is well -- always working as i am tonight. sometimes i come to enjoy the music and to dance. ♪ >> culturewire covers the arts in san francisco, and one of my favorite
with us in our opening of public beta in san francisco. >> good morning, everyone, it is an honor to be here for scoot's public announcement. this really does have great promise for helping to reduce carbon emissions in the city and county of san francisco. as some of you may know, about 40% of our carbon emissions in the city come from cars and trucks so we need to find alternatives for getting people out of their fossil fuel powered cars, this is going to be a great option for residences and businesses in san francisco to find an al -- an tern t*if, we're rolling out the electric vehicle infrastructure for cars so this is another electric vehicle option that we're happy to support. we also implement the commuter benefits program and help employers provide options to their employees for getting out of their cars, we're happy to add scoot and electric plug in scooters for people to community in the city and county of san francisco, so i'm here to be in support, we look forward to expanding the options for individuals and residents and businesses in the city to help protect the en
the san francisco business times for putting on this event. and i think for most of us in this room, we rely very heavily on the san francisco business times to keep track of what is going on in san francisco, and the greater bay area, in the real estate world. and it is the best source of that information for all of us. mary asked me if i would make a few observations about the general state of the real estate economy here in san francisco and as i do that, i always have to think about what to say that mary hasn't already said about it. and if you look at the real estate economy generally in our nation, and the fact that it is still soft. that we still need more jobs. that there is a recovery, but it's a slow recovery. you can't do that without thinking gee, will i sound like a politician for one or the other major political parties? and so i will steer clear of that and focus instead on san francisco and maybe we're living in a bubble, but it's a pretty wonderful bubble to be living in. the real question is the resurgence of real estate we're seeing now, is that sustained growth? is
and other folks who also could use additional employment. so i think jobs is a big issue for me. >> miss johnson? >> i agree that it's difficult to pick just one issue. but i think a lot of our policy issues that we're having, that you have in front of us come from a lack of accountable. where is your money being spent? how is it being spent? there is a lot of mismanagement. and there is a lot of money that goes places we don't know where it's going. and you can see it running through all of this discussion of all of the polices. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that we need to address, otherwise you will have the exact same problems of people asking for more and more people and creating a city where there is very wealthy and very poor people. so i would like to give a quick shout out in that direction to supervisor olague, who is having the san francisco housing authority try to film its meetings. it doesn't even meet at city hall and this is the kind of ineq
. and it is such an incredible honor to be here. thank you for america for hosting us, thank you for being an active inspiration, here for us and to the program. which we will talk more about today which was found in large part by... and thank you for getting the whole... chief information officer and mayor it is a huge honor to be in your presence as well. >> thank you so much for coming. >> thank you. >> and thank you all for taking time out of your busy schedules to come here today. we are here for a work session. we are actually going to go deep on which... and get your thoughts. so here is actually what is going to happen for the next couple of hours or so. we are going to have a brief context and then we will hear mayor lee make an exciting announcement. which i will introduce the projects and we will do... and break out into session and go deep and provide feedback. i need it and come back together for a... session. so,... talk about something called the... which is really an understanding for... the president in charge todd and i and many of our partners in the white house with waking up every single da
believe he is now saying that he would be happy to give us some kind of list and description of all 180 switchbacks in every month and then we could read about each switch back and determine for ourselves whether that was a good thing for the system or not, and our opinion that is not a statistical study. that's not a comparison in anyway. that's just a description of all the switchbacks th bjective opinion as to whether it wa a good thing or a bad thing, and he may have offered us to do that, but we decided that would have been perhaps a thousand switchbacks we would have to read about and make up our minds whether they were a good or bad idea. in other words, this is not a professional -- they haven't made a professional study of whether these switch backs were advantageiacy to the system in any way, whether they sped up or slowed down the system, or disadvantaged to the passengers. they haven't done any study on the impact to the passengers? . >> okay. thank you and in terms of the different jurisdictions and how they use switchbacks or they don't -- >> here's what we found. mr
importantly we knew if we didn't just talk the talk, that if we actually took the residents with us, and took all of the talent that we had in the city from the housing authority to our mayor's office of housing, to the redevelopment people, to the private developers, to the staff that has been so diligent, to the private nonprofit sector. the in incredible community based organizations and the bay view y and all these wonderful people that have been struggling for years saying "can we get some help? can we get some love in the town? can we do something that will get us all together? and we can all these nonprofits and bridge and mercy and coming together saying we can all do it and we team up with hope sf and the partners they created in saying it's not just brick and mortar that we're doing here. it's people first. the first thing that we have to do is bring hope to the people living there and then we went about saying what is the best way to do it? what are the best examples of rebuilding -- not housing. we said rebuild community. that's what we invested in and that's where the labo
we all celebrate that and i'm going to use baseball analogies all along and these grants don't win the series or the whole ball game but they are important building blocks of steps of confidence that involve the people. the next people up at bat are the people themselves and you're going to get trained in the people that we need. you're going to help us create better schools with our school district because that is part of the neighborhood. better transportation systems. small businesses that have all of the streets we're rebuilding and the old redevelopment and the successor agency called office of community investment and infrastructure. they're succeeding. they're the ones there. they're going to use smart investment strategies with the communities to build businesses there. we learned. you just can't put poor people in housing and expect them to survive and succeed. that's not how we have done it. we have done it because we built communities and people can work in different economic spectrums and ethnicities and bringing people together and how do you figure out the be
itself as being a leader an incubator of new ideas. new ideas that can help us be more sustainable and resilience every day. i wanted to take a moment to detail how san francisco is a sustainable seven -- city. being a sustainable city means we are less wasteful. we are leading the nation with over 78% diversion rate. 70% of our waste is recycled, compost, or diverted. being a sustainable city, we are energy-efficient. our energy program is a partnership that we have put together with pg&e and we help small businesses save money on energy bills and reduce carbon emissions. in san francisco, we are also renewable the powered. we have about 3000 solar installations throughout the city and county of san francisco, equalling 19 megawatts of solar. we are also working toward being 100% powered city in the next 10 years. finally, in san francisco, it means we are ev ready. we're making it easier for residents to take charge of their electric cars. the city now operates 50 publicly available charging stations at 15 locations. these are found at city parking garages, at the airport, treasu
as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment are essentially nil. there was a research study published recently i
that initiative forward. mayor lee -- i also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live
is over we hope you enjoy from refreshments and drinks with us. we have so much to celebrate tonight. >> and so many honorees to celebrate and are you true partners in making san francisco the best city in america in 2012. [applause] >> our theme for tonight's celebration is "community unity" because it's because of the collective efforts of the honorees across the diverse fields that bind us together. >> as we talk about about your programs and the media brings hope what means most to the community. we're we honor your success to san francisco or your distribution to the small businesses or the community or the youth or bringing the diversity to us through intricate sound. >> whether we inspire us in the community and bringing safety and respect to the most vulnerable among us. >> we salute all of our honorees tonight that bring pride and diggity to the san francisco latino community and let's give them all a round of applause to what they bring to our city of san francisco. [applause] >> so we know that every great city needs a equally great leader and our first presenter tonight i
, people who can't spend a lot of time in meetings with us, that can actually offer their ideas on line, and we take those ideas very seriously. so we've been working on things on like how to make muni faster, how to bring fresh foods to low income poverty areas of the city, and our newest one, just to given you a sense, we wanted everybody to help us develop and design a new library card. talk about civic engagement. 2,000 submissions on line for a new designed library card. that leads me to a challenge that i would like to announce, as part of this night rover challenge, and that is we have been asking ourselves a question, along the lines of energy use in the city, something that has been hard for us to figure out. and that has to do with what would inspire you, as someone who lives in the city, to give your data of your own energy use in the city, like your home energy use? all that data about when you use it, what are your hot times, your cool times. how about if we try to find some way to inspire people to give us that]h data, in some coordinated way. because if we understand that
to close the digital divide. >> you know, its's a humbling experience, it could be something simple to us in our daily lives but to someone that doesn't know and to help somebody gain that experience in any way, it's awesome. >> (speaking spanish). >> no matter how tired or cranky or whatever i miekt feel when i walk into this class, i walk out feeling great. >> if you feel comfortable using a cuter and you have patience, we want you on our team. >> with they showed me how to do skype. >> will you help me learn more? >> i love teaching. it is such an exhilarating experience when people began to feel their own creativity. >> this really is a place where all people can come and take a class and fill part of the community. this is very enriching as an artist. a lot of folks take these classes and take their digital imagery and turn it into negatives. >> there are not many black and white darkrooms available anymore. that is a really big draw. >> this is a signature piece. this is the bill largest darkroom in the u.s.. >> there are a lot of people that want to get into that dark room. >> i th
. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org. ♪ >> hello, and welcome to the department of elections right choice voting instructional video. it is part of the department of elections right choice voting outreach campaign and is designed to educate san francisco rig franciscoht choice voting. today we will learn what it is and who is elected using this voting method. we will also talk about with the ranked joyce l. looks like and how to market correctly. finally, we will see how the ranked joyce voting process works and to you an example of an election using ranked choice of voting. so, what is ranked joyce voting? in march 2002 san francisco voters adopted a charter to implement ranked choice of voting, also known as instant runoff voting. san francisco voters will use it to elect most local officials by selecting a first choice candidate in the first column on the ballot and deborah second and third choice candidates in the second and third columns resect to do -- respectively.
also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy an
to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy and it's not something that we as americans want to
were for iphones. i actually have a relatively simple solution for this. i would like us to look at -- it would be nice if you could ask apple to disable their phones. they now able to erase your information, but they will not disable your phone or at&t. unfortunately i'm afraid government is going to have to step in and say you must do this or we will sue you. there is lots of police time and energy and worse, there are many, many citizens who are getting really badly hurt for their iphones and their ipads. >> thank you, mr. resignato. >> i'm going to go back to transit issues. i think we need to double down on being a transit-first city, which means improving muni, so it's a viable transit option for everybody. i agree with increasing bike access and even experting with sunday streets, which is closing off a lot of your streets to car traffic. i think it's a great model, but i also think we have to do the simple things like fix the roads and sidewalks. there are a lot of places in district 5 where the sidewalks are in disrepair. i have had several friends who have tripped and
'm here to discuss proposition c the city currently uses federal, state and local funds to support affordable housing programs for both low income and moderate income households. recent federal cutbacks and reductions in state funding have decreased the funding available for affordable housing programs. proposition c would amend the charter to establish a housing trust fund. the city would contribute $20 million dollars to the fund in 2013. each year the city contribution would increase by 2.8 million dollars up to 50.8 million dollars in 2024. after 2024, the city would contribute an annual amount base the on the 50.8 million dollars but adjusted for changes in the city's general fund revenue. the city would use the fund to build, purchase and improve affordable housing, provide 15 million dollars for a loan program for down payment assistance for moderate income home buyers and emergency first responders and provide up to 15 million dollars for a program that would help eligible households avoid foreclosure. proposition c would change the affordable housing requirement for pri
the questions for tonight's debate. the results of the candidate survey are used by the san francisco public press to create a non-partisan voter guide that summarizes where the candidates stand on the issue and will be available on the website soon. meanwhile hvnnjp. preview you may pick up a copy of the current issue of the san francisco public press at the table in the back of the room, which has a fold out summarizing the candidates' position. a little bit about the format of this evening's event. each question will be directed to three candidates or in some cases two. each of these candidates will have one minute to respond. following the named candidates' responses, other candidates may elect to use one of their three discretionary time cards, which they have all been provided. to speak to the question for one minute as well. we ask that after the candidate uses the card, they deposit the card in the basket in front of them, so each candidate, in fact, uses the card on only three occasions. the timekeeper in the first row will hold up a yellow card to signify to the speaking candidat
anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and at they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass it
the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment ar
are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better
that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can a
to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured
disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment are essentially nil. there was a research study published recently in a san francisco newspaper, that showed the rate of drug convictions dropped, and the violent crime here in san francisco did not rise. essentially what we're saying is that there is no correlation between drug use and violent crime. so the whole notion that we have to go after these folks to go into their neighborhoods and essentially make had a police state of their neighborhoods is ridiculous, preposte
forward. mayor lee -- i also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live
for many students of -- middle school. there were any other passenger who wants to use that particular line,ijcayi>> chairman nolan: thank you. >> wilson habib. he's the last person who has turned in a speaker card. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i know that whatever i say, it is not going to change your mi mind. but i've been serving san francisco for the last more than 10 years. i've been taking people to hospitals, i've been taking people to, you know, your family, your family members, to whatever they want to go. proudly serving the san francisco for more than 10 years. but in return, what i've been waiting -- the waiting list more than eight years. in return what i got is nothing. we offer mta more than the company -- what the company offered. i don't know
biz and others to develop an app that everyone can use. that's a great challenge. that's going to be so worthy of contributing to a goal that we've had about reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at e data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people will be creative in having thisçe challenge to be something positive for the city. i wanted to announce that, get that out there with you, and join this wonderful challenge that you have, and think about how we could work together. meanwhile, in between that stuff and in between celebrating the month and doing things we have to write a proposal to win the superbowl in san francisco. thank you very much. thank you. >> [applause.] >> thank you, mayor lee. >> . >> okay. mr. mayor good morning everyone. i am mr. alva residence and the director of the housing aut
's over 200 events and parties, opportunities for us to highlight the best of this region. we don't have the details, looking at february 2016 if we are fortunate enough to win this bid. but there is a lot of different events that go on. every restaurant will be full. all hotel also be full. event spaces will be full from san jose to santa clara, san francisco and i have started talking to people in napa and sonoma. they are excited to be as well. >>> we said earlier super bowl 50 is very special. the nfl has been playing games in other countries for the sport. san francisco is an inter national city so we will probably have additional events that no one's thought of in terms of not only celebrating the 50ses but emphasizing inter national perspective on the sport of football. that is a key strength. like any franchise, they are looking for more market gain, this is where it will happen. >> we are going to ask rich to come up. if this group could stay and answer questions. but rich has a special way to throw this out. once again thank you to goodby silverstein for everything. >> i like t
. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million dollars. in my own district, out at like merced, we're taking t
. so jobs has been a huge priority for us. trying to find -- trying to work with city agencies, with community-based organizations, to make sure that young people, especially, have opportunities to make choices in their lives. and so that is why we have been focused very much on job-training and wrap-around services in that respect also. i think there are older adults and other folks who also could use additional employment. so i think jobs is a big issue for me. >> miss johnson? >> i agree that it's difficult to pick just one issue. but i think a lot of our policy issues that we're having, that you have in front of us come from a lack of accountable. where is your money being spent? how is it being spent? there is a lot of mismanagement. and there is a lot of money that goes places we don't know where it's going. and you can see it running through all of this discussion of all of the polices. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that we need to address
alaamed the president of the schooo police union... and s crime and justiie reporter joy lepola shoos us... us...the trend has outtaged a city council member. ww had to the ttentionnof s baltimore city councilman carl stokes... he questioned the transpprency or lacc there of public school system.ciiy - ((pkg)) innthe past nine months.... more than 150 schools.. crimes went in city - unreported to baltimore city police. insteaa an in-house (stokes) 23:13:57 can't figure out exactly why so any agencies doo't want to be trasparent. besides ccuncilman carl stokes... ttere is also concern from the president of he school police when you look at the numbee of weapons the reports handled internally it'ssaamost doublee what was reported to police. ok... thatts a concern that's aaconcerr smiles. out of the 47 weaponsscases thaa reffrall... most involveed knives. again, weappns recovered n school grounds put were never documented with a police reeort. (union) rise. i would say it's on the rise and aggin who is maaagement.. stand up-when a - policc report is generated by sccool poli
of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain things. live stages have big-name bands. headlining the folsom street fair, people are now looking forward to our entertainment in ways they did not 10 years ago. >> commander, how do we prepared to assist an outdoor event? what training do the folks on the street have when engaging with patrons of the event? >> i am sorry, i have never heard of little booth. not my genre, i guess. you know, all of our officers receive a lot of training at the academy level and the special operations group on crowd control. you all know the chief was year earlier. an outstanding job, he spoke to everyone, it
, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you wil
there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not hav
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